Curiosity University: Where Entertainment Meets Education

Every great professor has one very best talk that attracts a standing-room only crowd. Now you can watch, too.

    • 46m
    • 86%

    Did an asteroid impact really lead to the extinction of the dinosaurs? Paleontologist Steve Brusatte presents new evidence from the fossil record confirming this theory. Learn how the asteroid's short-term, mid-term and longer-term effects killed the dinosaurs, but spared the mammals.

    • 56m
    • 67%

    Ranking the presidents has been called the ultimate parlor game but there are some unique challenges to rating presidential performance. In this program, we will explore the creation of the presidency by the Framers and the challenges of the office.

    • 54m
    • 84%

    This presentation examines the ideas, policies and events that shaped the conquest of the West. Professor O’Donnell will also look at the ways in which our image of the West shaped, and continues to shape, the American imagination and self-image.

    • 50m
    • 82%

    Why is ancient Egypt so compelling to us today? Because it’s utterly unique on this planet. A totalitarian regime with a veritable God-King at the helm. A protected realm full of riches beyond reckoning and agricultural resources that allowed an unassailable divine kingship to develop.

    • 45m
    • 78%

    Historian Richard Bell tells the true story of the 1773 Boston Tea Party. This unprecedented act of domestic terrorism marked the first major American protest against corporate greed and the effects of globalization, setting the stage for the American Revolution.

    • 1h 13m
    • 89%

    For 6000 years, religions have had both spiritual concepts and concrete ones. Like how does time itself end? Who should believers wage war against, and why? Will the world will be destroyed by flames, and is that inevitable? What’s the meaning of the Apocalypse? What is Millennialism? Eschatology?

    • 1h 8m
    • 89%

    The 80 years between the Civil War and World War 2 saw America emerge as the wealthiest and most powerful nation in the world. But it might have gone differently. This course highlights six people who helped cement America’s rise — presidents, industrialists, and thought leaders.

    • 50m
    • 89%

    In this lecture, Professor Hitchcock will examine some of the major changes–some welcome and some unwelcome–that came to America as it fought and won World War 2.

    • 1h 0m
    • 94%

    We’re still a long way from understanding everything about our universe or ourselves. From whether other intelligent life exists, to where life comes from, and the nature of consciousness. This course explains how questions like these drive science forward, and why we still cut answer them.

  • Original
    • E7
    • 59m
    • 88%

    Through her unique understanding of some of our greatest presidents, Doris Kearns Goodwin, writer and presidential biographer, provides leadership lessons we all can learn from in our never-ending pursuit to live our fullest and most successful lives.

    • 55m
    • 62%

    “The first Pride was a riot” is a popular mantra in LGBTQ circles—and there’s real truth to it. In this lecture, Professor McCarthy will discuss the power of Stonewall—what preceded it, what happened during it, what came after it—to explain its centrality and significance in modern LGBTQ history.

    • 49m
    • 89%

    The American presidency is the most powerful political office in the world. Surprisingly, most contemporary presidents have found themselves severely constrained in their ability to pursue their chosen agendas for domestic and foreign policy change.

    • 54m
    • 89%

    He was our longest-serving president and also our best. Washington set precedents. Lincoln preserved the union. But only Franklin D. Roosevelt was elected to the nation’s highest office four times. Only Roosevelt faced an economic crisis so severe it remains our benchmark today for calamity.

    • 1h 1m
    • 93%

    We’ve entered an era where terrifying and amazing things can be done to the human body. Precise cancer treatments, immunotherapies, and “one-and-done” million-dollar drug doses, are also raising hopes and new questions. Are we ready for this new world?

  • Original
    • 48m
    • 94%

    The Berlin Wall was one of the most iconic structures ever built, and to millions of people it became something to fear, struggle against, subvert, mock, and ultimately tear down. This lecture explores it history, meaning, and ultimate demise. And why it still plays a role our our collective memory.

    • 43m
    • 63%

    In this course, Black Studies professor Karlos K. Hill will explain why initially enslaved blacks–-and today millions of Americans from diverse backgrounds--increasingly celebrate June 19, 1865, the moment when enslaved blacks in Galveston, Texas learned that they were no longer enslaved.

    • 55m
    • 75%

    This lecture examines the enormity of the planning and the operation, the Nazi defenses and costly mistakes, the phases of the operation and strategies on both sides, and the extraordinary actions of the Allied soldiers.

    • 50m
    • 93%

    The brilliant Polish physicist and chemist Marie Curie lived a life of profound personal courage. Her experiences illuminate a culture of “pure science” now long gone, and they help us understand some of the continuing issues for women scientists.

  • Original
    • 47m
    • 88%

    Most people think the story of Rosa Parks, the seamstress with “tired feet”, started when she refused to give up her bus seat to a white man. Instead, long before her arrest in Alabama, she’d been working as an organizer and activist in Montgomery.